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2019 Super Bowl Commercials

Super Bowl LIII Commercial Breakdown

Let’s take a look at some of the most interesting, controversial, and appealing Super Bowl Commercials of 2019!

Audi’s jump into electric cars offered an interesting take in advertising. A man is dying at the moment, and his brain-starved mind is evoking an idyllic setting, getting to see his Gramps, and of course, his dream car (which happens to be electric). Then Audi states every model that will be electric by 2025. It’s still a dream and just beyond our collective reach. The goal of the ad is to make sure a present Audi owner won’t defect to Tesla. If you just wait, Audi will give you the better alternative. It’s the perfect anti-Tesla advertisement without ever mentioning them. They don’t want you to buy electric today. They’re not ready. They know people are switching. They know they’re losing sales today. So they present the perfect dream sequence of Tesla’s electric solution.

Even Pepsi admits that Coke is everyone’s first choice. But Cardi B’s bedazzled Pepsi might give an advantage, OKURRRRR. Carell carried the humor like he always does but nothing really sticks with this commercial in terms of a connection or piece of humor that people can talk about for weeks after. It feels a little like more of the same.

On the opposite side of the spectrum were these incredible T-Mobile advertisements. The series of commercials touched upon text conversations we’ve all had at some point. Making something relatable, really funny, and memorable.

Intriguing glitch intro, although it might be overdone, it still really works for a Super Bowl advertisement. Jordan Peele introducing a new series called “The Twilight Zone” is really absolutely perfect. Jordan’s directorial debut “Get Out“ was a stand out horror / thriller in 2017 and his next film “Us” looks terrifying as well. I’m excited to see how “The Twilight Zone” will separate itself from it’s more modern interpretation, “Black Mirror.” I think the visuals and haunting throwback tune really set the mood for what we can expect.

If you stuck around to the fourth quarter of the game you were treated to a 45-second snippet of Andy Warhol enjoying a plain hamburger from Burger King. Taken from a clip of Warhol’s performance in “66 Scenes from America,” Andy’s iconic meal hoists Burger King’s iconic brand. Burger King’s global CMO Fernando Machado says the ad “truly elevates the Whopper to its iconic stature.” Funnily enough, when Andy showed up to film that shoot he was disappointed, he wasn’t sinking his teeth into a Big Mac, since McDonald’s was his preferred brand by far. “The most beautiful thing in Tokyo is McDonald’s,” the artist wrote in his 1975 The Philosophy of Andy Warhol. “The most beautiful thing in Stockholm is McDonald’s. The most beautiful thing in Florence is McDonald’s. Peking and Moscow don’t have anything beautiful yet.”

While this game was the lowest-scoring Super Bowl ever, the advertising industry boomed with some creative and exceptional commercials this year. Companies battling to have a memorable Super Bowl commercial each year can be taxing and it’s easier said than done. But after people talk about the results of the game, the talk around the water cooler is what commercials people liked the best.